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Immunization

VACCINES

Photo of patient with by Dr. Lozano
 
 

Introduction:

We recommend all children be vaccinated according to the schedule published by the US Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention. However, if as a parent you do not wish to have your children vaccinated, we understand that you have a choice and will still be happy to serve as your children's medical doctor. 

Your child does NOT have to be vaccinated to attend school. There is no federal law mandating vaccine exemptions. It is left up to individual states. Every state has at least one kind. Some have two or even three. All 50 states have a medical exemption. All states except Mississippi and West Virginia have religious exemptions. And 18 have philosophical exemptions including Texas. In Texas, parents who want a philosophical exemption must sign an Affidavit Request for Exemption from Immunization for Reasons of Conscience. The form can be mailed, faxed, hand delivered, or filled in online.

To find out which exemptions are available in Texas and how to go about getting one, visit the National Vaccine Information Center website. Click on Texas on the map. You will find a page of links that contain specific requirements and, in most cases, forms for each type. You can also Google "Texas health department" for information.

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Click for Immunization Schedule 0–6 Years
 

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Click for Immunization Schedule 0–18 Years
 

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Click for Immunization Schedule for Adults
 

Description of Vaccines

 

Any vaccine can cause side effects. For the most part these are minor (for example, a sore arm or low-grade fever) and go away within a few days. Listed below are vaccines licensed in the United States and side effects that have been associated with each of them. This information is copied directly from CDC's Vaccine Information Statements, which in turn are derived from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations for each vaccine.

Remember, vaccines are continually monitored for safety, and like any medication, vaccines can cause side effects. However, a decision not to immunize a child also involves risk and could put the child and others who come into contact with him or her at risk of contracting a potentially deadly disease.

Adenovirus vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from Adenovirus vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, could cause a serious reaction. But the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small.

Mild Problems

Several mild problems have been reported within 2 weeks of getting the vaccine:

  • headaches, upper respiratory tract infection (about 1 person in 3)
  • stuffy nose, sore throat, joint pain (about 1 person in 6)
  • abdominal pain, cough, nausea (about 1 person in 7)
  • diarrhea (about 1 person in 10)
  • fever (about 1 person in 100)

Severe Problems

More serious problems have been reported by about 1 person in 100, within 6 months of vaccination. These problems included:

  • blood in the urine or stool
  • pneumonia
  • inflammation of the stomach or intestines

It is not clear whether these mild or serious problems were caused by the vaccine or occurred after vaccination by chance.

As with all vaccines, adenovirus vaccine will continue to be monitored for unexpected or severe problems.

Note: Adenovirus vaccine is approved for use only among military personnel.

This information was taken directly from the Adenovirus VIS
(This information taken from Adenovirus VIS dated 7/14/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Anthrax vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from anthrax vaccine?

Like any medicine, a vaccine could cause a serious problem, such as a severe allergic reaction.

Anthrax is a very serious disease, and the risk of serious harm from the vaccine is small.

Mild Problems

  • Reactions on the arm where the shot was given:
    • Tenderness (about 1 person out of 2)
    • Redness (about 1 out of 7 men and 1 out of 3 women)
    • Itching (about 1 out of 50 men and 1 out of 20 women)
    • Lump (about 1 out of 60 men and 1 out of 16 women)
    • Bruise (about 1 out of 25 men and 1 out of 22 women)
  • Muscle aches or temporary limitation of arm movement (about 1 out of 14 men and 1 out of 10 women)
  • Headaches (about 1 out of 25 men and 1 out of 12 women)
  • Fatigue (about 1 out of 15 men, about 1 out of 8 women)

Severe Problems

  • Serious allergic reaction (very rare - less than once in 100,000 doses).

As with any vaccine, other severe problems have been reported. But these don’t appear to occur any more often among anthrax vaccine recipients than among unvaccinated people.

There is no evidence that anthrax vaccine causes long-term health problems.

Independent civilian committees have not found anthrax vaccination to be a factor in unexplained illnesses among Gulf War veterans.

This information was taken directly from the Anthrax VIS
(This information taken from Anthrax VIS dated 3/10/10. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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DTaP vaccine side-effects

(Diphtheria, Tetanus, and acellular Pertussis)

What are the risks from DTaP vaccine?

Getting diphtheria, tetanus or pertussis disease is much riskier than getting DTaP vaccine.

However, a vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of DTaP vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small.

Mild Problems (Common)

  • Fever (up to about 1 child in 4)
  • Redness or swelling where the shot was given (up to about 1 child in 4)
  • Soreness or tenderness where the shot was given (up to about 1 child in 4)

These problems occur more often after the 4th and 5th doses of the DTaP series than after earlier doses.

Sometimes the 4th or 5th dose of DTaP vaccine is followed by swelling of the entire arm or leg in which the shot was given, for 1 to 7 days (up to about 1 child in 30).

Other mild problems include:

  • Fussiness (up to about 1 child in 3)
  • Tiredness or poor appetite (up to about 1 child in 10)
  • Vomiting (up to about 1 child in 50)

These problems generally occur 1 to 3 days after the shot.

Moderate Problems (Uncommon)

  • Seizure (jerking or staring) (about 1 child out of 14,000)
  • Non-stop crying, for 3 hours or more (up to about 1 child out of 1,000)
  • High fever, 105 degrees Fahrenheit or higher (about 1 child out of 16,000)

Severe Problems (Very Rare)
Serious allergic reaction (less than 1 out of a million doses) Several other severe problems have been reported after DTaP vaccine. These include:

  • Long-term seizures, coma, or lowered consciousness
  • Permanent brain damage.

These are so rare it is hard to tell if they are caused by the vaccine.

Controlling fever is especially important for children who have had seizures, for any reason. It is also important if another family member has had seizures.

You can reduce fever and pain by giving your child an aspirin-free pain reliever when the shot is given, and for the next 24 hours, following the package instructions.

This information was taken directly from the DTaP VIS
(This information taken from DTaP VIS dated 5/17/07. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Hepatitis A vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from hepatitis A vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, could possibly cause serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of hepatitis A vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small.

Getting hepatitis A vaccine is much safer than getting the disease.

Mild Problems

  • soreness where the shot was given (about 1 out of 2 adults, and up to 1 out of 6 children)
  • headache (about 1 out of 6 adults and 1 out of 25 children)
  • loss of appetite (about 1 out of 12 children)
  • tiredness (about 1 out of 14 adults)

If these problems occur, they usually last 1 or 2 days

Severe Problems

  • serious allergic reaction, within a few minutes to a few hours after the shot (very rare).

This information was taken directly from the Hepatitis A VIS
(This information taken from Hepatitis A VIS dated 10/25/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Hepatitis B vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from hepatitis B vaccine?

Hepatitis B is a very safe vaccine. Most people do not have any problems with it.

The vaccine contains non-infectious material, and cannot cause hepatitis B infection.

Some mild problems have been reported

  • Soreness where the shot was given (up to about 1 person 4)
  • Temperature of 99.9°F or higher (up to about 1
    person in 15).

Severe problems are rare. Severe allergic reactions are believed to occur about once in 1.1 million doses.

A vaccine, like any medicine, could cause a serious reaction. But the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small. More than 100 million people in the United States have been vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine.

This information was taken directly from the Hepatitis B VIS
(This information taken from Hepatitis B VIS dated 2/2/12. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Hib vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of Hib vaccine causing serious harm or death is small.

Most people who get Hib vaccine do not have any problems with it.

Mild Problems

  • Redness, warmth, or swelling where the shot was given (up to 1 out of 4 children)
  • Fever over 101 degrees Fahrenheit (up to 1 out of 20 children)

If these problems happen, they usually start within a day of vaccination. They may last 2 to 3 days.

This information was taken directly from the Hib VIS
(This information taken from Hib VIS dated 12/16/98. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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HPV--Cervarix vaccine side-effects

(Human Papillomavirus Cervarix vaccine)

What are the risks from HPV--Cervarix vaccine?

The HPV Cervarix® vaccine has been in use around the world for several years and has been very safe.

However, any medicine could possibly cause a serious problem, such as a severe allergic reaction. The risk of any vaccine causing a serious injury, or death, is small.

Life-threatening allergic reactions from vaccines are very rare. If they do occur, it would be within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

Several mild to moderate problems are known to occur with this HPV vaccine. These do not last long and go away on their own.

  • Reactions where the shot was given
    • Pain (about 9 people in 10)
    • Redness or swelling (about 1 person in 2)
  • Other mild reactions
    • Fever of 99.5 or higher degrees Fahrenheit (about 1 person in 8)
    • Headache or fatigue (about 1 person in 2)
    • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain (about 1 person in 4)
    • Muscle or joint pain (up to 1 person in 2)
  • Fainting
    Brief fainting spells and related symptoms (such as jerking movements) can happen after any medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes after a vaccination can help prevent fainting and injuries caused by falls. Tell your doctor if the patient feels dizzy or light-headed, or has vision changes or ringing in the ears.

Like all vaccines, HPV vaccines will continue to be monitored for unusual or severe problems.

This information was taken directly from the HPV-Cervarix VIS
(This information taken from HPV VIS dated 5/3/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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HPV--Gardasil vaccine side-effects

(Human Papillomavirus Cervarix vaccine)

What are the risks from HPV--Gardasil vaccine?

The HPV-Gardasil® vaccine has been used in the U.S. and around the world for about six years and has been very safe.

However, any medicine could possibly cause a serious problem, such as a severe allergic reaction. The risk of any vaccine causing a serious injury, or death, is small.

Life-threatening allergic reactions from vaccines are very rare. If they do occur, it would be within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

Several mild to moderate problems are known to occur with this HPV vaccine. These do not last long and go away on their own.

  • Reactions in the arm where the shot was given:
    • Pain (about 8 people in 10)
    • Redness or swelling (about 1 person in 4)
  • Fever:
    • Mild (100° F) (about 1 person in 10)
    • Moderate (102° F) (about 1 person in 65)
  • Other problems
    • Headache (about 1 person in 3)
    • Fainting. Brief fainting spells and related symptoms (such as jerking movements) can happen after any medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes after a vaccination can help prevent fainting and injuries caused by falls. Tell your doctor if the
      patient feels dizzy or light-headed, or has vision changes or ringing in the ears.

Like all vaccines, HPV vaccines will continue to be monitored for unusual or severe problems.

This information was taken directly from the HPV-Gardasil VIS
(This information taken from HPV VIS dated 5/17/13. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Influenza (inactivated) vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from inactivated influenza vaccine?

With a vaccine, like any medicine, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

Serious side effects are also possible, but are very rare. Inactivated flu vaccine does not contain live flu virus, so getting flu from this vaccine is not possible.

Brief fainting spells and related symptoms (such as jerking movements) can happen after any medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes after a vaccination can help prevent fainting and injuries caused by falls. Tell your doctor if you feel dizzy or light-headed, or have vision changes or ringing in the ears.

Mild Problems

  • soreness, redness, or swelling where the shot was given
  • hoarseness; sore, red or itchy eyes; cough
  • fever
  • aches
  • headache
  • itching
  • fatigue

If these problems occur, they usually begin soon after the shot and last 1 or 2 days.

Moderate Problems

Young children who get inactivated flu vaccine and pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) at the same time may be at increased risk for seizures caused by fever. Ask your doctor for more information. Tell your doctor if a child who is getting flu vaccine has ever had a seizure.

Severe Problems

  • A severe allergic reaction could occur after any vaccine (estimated less than 1 in a million doses).
  • There is a small possibility that inactivated flu vaccine could be associated with Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS), no more than 1 or 2 cases per million people vaccinated. This is much lower than the risk of severe complications from flu, which can be prevented by flu vaccine.

The safety of vaccines is always being monitored. For more information, visit: Vaccine Safety Monitoring and Vaccine Safety Activities.

One brand of inactivated flu vaccine, called Afluria, should not be given to children 8 years of age or younger, except in special circumstances. A related vaccine was associated with fevers and fever-related seizures in young children in Australia. Your doctor can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the Inactivated Influenza VIS
(This information taken from Inactivated Influenza VIS dated 7/26/2013. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Influenza (live) vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from LAIV?

With a vaccine, like any medicine, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

Serious side effects are also possible, but are very rare. LAIV is made from weakened virus and does not cause flu.

Mild Problems
Some children and adolescents 2-17 years of age have reported:

  • runny nose, nasal congestion or cough
  • fever
  • headache and muscle aches
  • wheezing
  • abdominal pain or occasional vomiting or diarrhea

Some adults 18-49 years of age have reported:

  • runny nose or nasal congestion
  • sore throat
  • cough, chills, tiredness/weakness
  • headache

Severe Problems

A severe allergic reaction could occur after any vaccine (estimated less than 1 in a million doses).

The safety of vaccines is always being monitored. For more information, visit: Vaccine Safety Monitoring and Vaccine Safety Activities.

This information was taken directly from the LAIV VIS
(This information taken from Live Influenza VIS dated 7/2/12. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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JE-IXIARO vaccine side-effects

(Japanese Encephalitis - IXIARO)

What are the risks from Japanese encephalitis vaccine?

Like any medicine, a vaccine could cause a serious reaction. But the risk of JE vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small.

Mild Problems

  • pain or tenderness where the shot was given (about 1 person in 4)
  • redness or swelling where the shot was given (about 1 person in 20)
  • headache, muscle aches (about 1 person in 5)

Moderate or Severe Problems

Studies of this vaccine have shown severe reactions to be very rare. Like all vaccines, it will continue to be monitored for serious problems.

This information was taken directly from the JE-Ixiaro VIS
(This information taken from Japanese Encephalitis Ixiaro VIS dated 12/7/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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MMR vaccine side-effects

(Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)

What are the risks from MMR vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions.

The risk of MMR vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small.

Getting MMR vaccine is much safer than getting measles, mumps or rubella.

Most people who get MMR vaccine do not have any serious problems with it.

Mild Problems

  • Fever (up to 1 person out of 6)
  • Mild rash (about 1 person out of 20)
  • Swelling of glands in the cheeks or neck (about 1 person out of 75)

If these problems occur, it is usually within 7-12 days after the shot. They occur less often after the second dose.

Moderate Problems

  • Seizure (jerking or staring) caused by fever (about 1 out of 3,000 doses)
  • Temporary pain and stiffness in the joints, mostly in teenage or adult women (up to 1 out of 4)
  • Temporary low platelet count, which can cause a bleeding disorder (about 1 out of 30,000 doses)

Severe Problems (Very Rare)

  • Serious allergic reaction (less than 1 out of a million doses)
  • Several other severe problems have been reported after a child gets MMR vaccine, including:
    • Deafness
    • Long-term seizures, coma, or lowered consciousness
    • Permanent brain damage

    These are so rare that it is hard to tell whether they are caused by the vaccine.

This information was taken directly from the MMR VIS
(This information taken from MMR VIS dated 4/20/12. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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MMRV vaccine side-effects

(Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella)

What are the risks from MMRV vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of MMRV vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small.

Getting MMRV vaccine is much safer than getting measles, mumps, rubella, or chickenpox.

Most children who get MMRV vaccine do not have any problems with it.

Mild Problems

  • Fever (about 1 child out of 5).
  • Mild rash (about 1 child out of 20).
  • Swelling of glands in the cheeks or neck (rare).

If these problems happen, it is usually within 5-12 days after the first dose. They happen less often after the second dose.

Moderate Problems

  • Seizure caused by fever (about 1 child in 1,250 who get MMRV), usually 5-12 days after the first dose. They happen less often when MMR and varicella vaccines are given at the same visit as separate shots (about 1 child in 2,500 who get these two vaccines), and rarely after a 2nd dose of MMRV.
  • Temporary low platelet count, which can cause a bleeding disorder (about 1 child out of 40,000).

Severe Problems (Very Rare)
Several severe problems have been reported following MMR vaccine, and might also happen after MMRV. These include severe allergic reactions (fewer than 4 per million), and problems such as:

  • Deafness.
  • Long-term seizures, coma, lowered consciousness.
  • Permanent brain damage.

Because these problems occur so rarely, we can’t be sure whether they are caused by the vaccine or not.

This information was taken directly from the MMRV VIS
(This information taken from MMRV VIS dated 5/21/10. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Meningococcal vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from meningococcal vaccines?

A vaccine, like any medicine, could possibly cause serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of the meningococcal vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small.

Brief fainting spells and related symptoms (such as jerking or seizure-like movements) can follow a vaccination. They happen most often with adolescents, and they can result in falls and injuries.

Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes after getting the shot - especially if you feel faint - can help prevent these injuries.

Mild Problems

As many as half the people who get meningococcal vaccines have mild side effects, such as redness or pain where the shot was given.

If these problems occur, they usually last for 1 or 2 days. They are more common after MCV4 than after MPSV4.

A small percentage of people who receive the vaccine develop a fever.

Severe Problems

Serious allergic reactions, within a few minutes to a few hours of the shot, are very rare.

This information was taken directly from the Meningococcal VIS
(This information taken from Meningococcal VIS dated 10/14/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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PCV13 vaccine side-effects

(Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine)

What are the risks from PCV13?

With any medicine, including vaccines, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own, but serious reactions are also possible.

Reported problems associated with PCV13 vary by dose and age, but generally:

  • About half of children became drowsy after the shot, had a temporary loss of appetite, or had redness or tenderness where the shot was given.
  • About 1 out of 3 had swelling where the shot was given.
  • About 1 out of 3 had a mild fever, and about 1 in 20 had a higher fever (over 102.2°F).
  • Up to about 8 out of 10 became fussy or irritable.

Adults receiving the vaccine have reported redness, pain, and swelling where the shot was given. Mild fever, fatigue, headache, chills, or muscle pain have also been reported.

Life-threatening allergic reactions from any vaccine are very rare.

This information was taken directly from the PCV VIS
(This information taken from PCV VIS dated 2/27/13. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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PPSV23 vaccine side-effects

(Pneumococcal Polysaccharide)

What are the risks from PPSV?

About half of people who get PPSV have mild side effects, such as redness or pain where the shot is given.

Less than 1 percent develop a fever, muscle aches, or more severe local reactions.

A vaccine, like any medicine, could cause a serious reaction. But the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small.

This information was taken directly from the PPSV VIS
(This information taken from PPSV VIS dated 10/6/09. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Polio vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from IPV?

Some people who get Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV) get a sore spot where the shot was given. The vaccine used today has never been known to cause any serious problems, and most people don’t have any problems at all with it.

However, a vaccine, like any medicine, could cause serious problems, such as a severe allergic reaction or even death. The risk of a polio vaccine causing serious harm is small.

This information was taken directly from the IPV VIS
(This information taken from IPV VIS dated 11/08/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Rabies vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from rabies vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small. Serious problems from rabies vaccine are very rare.

Mild Problems

  • soreness, redness, swelling, or itching where the shot was given (30% - 74%)
  • headache, nausea, abdominal pain, muscle aches, dizziness (5% - 40%)

Moderate Problems

  • hives, pain in the joints, fever (about 6% of booster doses)

Other nervous system disorders, such as Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS), have been reported after rabies vaccine, but this happens so rarely that it is not known whether they are related to the vaccine.

NOTE: Several brands of rabies vaccine are available in the United States, and reactions may vary between brands. Your provider can give you more information about a particular brand.

This information was taken directly from the Rabies VIS
(This information taken from Rabies VIS dated 10/6/09. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Rotavirus vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from rotavirus vaccine?

With a vaccine, like any medicine, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

Serious side effects are also possible, but are very rare.

Most babies who get rotavirus vaccine do not have any problems with it. But some problems have been associated with rotavirus vaccine:

Mild problems

Babies might become irritable, or have mild, temporary diarrhea or vomiting after getting a dose of rotavirus vaccine.

Serious problems

Intussusception is a type of bowel blockage that is treated in a hospital, and could require surgery. It happens “naturally” in some babies every year in the United States, and usually there is no known reason for it.

There is also a small risk of intussusception from rotavirus vaccination, usually within a week after the 1st or 2nd vaccine dose. This additional risk is estimated to range from about 1 in 20,000 US infants to 1 in 100,000 US infants who get rotavirus vaccine. Your doctor can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the Rotavirus VIS
(This information taken from Rotavirus VIS dated 8/26/13. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Shingles (Herpes Zoster) vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from shingles vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, could possibly cause serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. However, the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small.

No serious problems have been identified with shingles vaccine.

Mild Problems

  • Redness, soreness, swelling, or itching at the site of the injection (about 1 person in 3).
  • Headache (about 1 person in 70).

Like all vaccines, shingles vaccine is being closely monitored for unusual or severe problems.

This information was taken directly from the Shingles VIS
(This information taken from Shingles VIS dated 10/6/09. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Smallpox (Vaccinia) vaccine side-effects

This medication guide replaces the Smallpox VIS. It is to be used before one receives the vaccination. Medical Guide for vaccination with ACAM2000 Adobe Acrobat print-friendly PDF file [PDF - 85 KB] (10/1/09)

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Td vaccine

(Adult Tetanus & Diphtheria)

What are the risks from Td vaccine?

With a vaccine, as with any medicine, there is always a small risk of a life-threatening allergic reaction or other serious problem.

Brief fainting spells and related symptoms (such as jerking movements) can happen after any medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes after a vaccination can help prevent fainting and injuries caused by falls. Tell your doctor if the patient feels dizzy or light-headed, or has vision changes or ringing in the ears.

Getting tetanus, diphtheria or pertussis would be much more likely to lead to severe problems than getting either vaccine. Problems reported after Td and Tdap vaccines are listed below.

Problems reported after Td vaccine are listed below.

Mild Problems
(Noticeable, but did not interfere with activities)

Td

  • Pain (up to about 8 in 10)
  • Redness or swelling at the injection site(up to about 1 in 3)
  • Mild fever (up to about 1 in 15)
  • Headache or tiredness (uncommon)
Moderate Problems
(Interfered with activities, but did not require medical attention)
Td
  • Fever over 102°F (rare)
  • Extensive swelling of the arm where the shot was given (up to about 3 in 100).
Severe Problems
(Unable to perform usual activities; required medical attention)
Td
  • Swelling, severe pain, bleeding and redness in the arm where the shot was given (rare).

A severe allergic reaction could occur after any vaccine. They are estimated to occur less than once in a million doses.

This information was taken directly from the Td VIS
(This information taken from Td-Tdap VIS dated 1/24/12. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Tdap vaccine

(Combined Tetanus, Diphtheria & Pertussis)

What are the risks from Tdap vaccine?

With any medicine, including vaccines, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

Brief fainting spells can follow a vaccination, leading to injuries from falling. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent these. Tell your doctor if you feel dizzy or light-headed, or have vision changes or ringing in the ears.

Mild problems following Tdap
(Did not interfere with activities)

  • Pain where the shot was given (about 3 in 4 adolescents or 2 in 3 adults)
  • Redness or swelling where the shot was given (about 1 person in 5)
  • Mild fever of at least 100.4°F (up to about 1 in 25 adolescents or 1 in 100 adults)
  • Headache (about 3 or 4 people in 10)
  • Tiredness (about 1 person in 3 or 4)
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach ache (up to 1 in 4 adolescents or 1 in 10 adults)
  • Chills, body aches, sore joints, rash, swollen glands (uncommon)

Mild problems following Tdap
(Interfered with activities, but did not require medical attention)

  • Pain where the shot was given (about 1 in 5 adolescents or 1 in 100 adults)
  • Redness or swelling where the shot was given (up to about 1 in 16 adolescents or 1 in 25 adults)
  • Fever over 102°F (about 1 in 100 adolescents or 1 in 250 adults)
  • Headache (about 3 in 20 adolescents or 1 in 10 adults)
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach ache (up to 1 or 3 people in 100)
  • Swelling of the entire arm where the shot was given (up to about 3 in 100).

Severe problems following Tdap
(Unable to perform usual activities; required medical attention)

  • Swelling, severe pain, bleeding and redness in the arm where the shot was given (rare).

A severe allergic reaction could occur after any vaccine (estimated to occur less than once in a million doses).

This information was taken directly from the Tdap VIS
(This information taken from Td-Tdap VIS dated 5/9/13. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Typhoid vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from typhoid vaccine?

Like any medicine, a vaccine could cause a serious problem, such as a severe allergic reaction. The risk of typhoid vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small. Serious problems from either typhoid vaccine are very rare.

Inactivated Typhoid Vaccine (Shot)

  Mild Reactions

  • Fever (up to about 1 person per 100).
  • Headache (up to about 1 person in 30).
  • Redness or swelling at the site of the injection (up to about 1 person in 15).
Live Typhoid Vaccine (Oral)

  Mild Reactions

  • Fever or headache (up to about 1 person in 20).
  • Stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, rash (rare).

This information was taken directly from the Typhoid VIS
(This information taken from Typhoid VIS dated 5/29/12. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Varicella (Chickenpox) vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from chickenpox vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of chickenpox vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is small.

Getting chickenpox vaccine is much safer than getting chickenpox disease. Most people who get chickenpox vaccine do not have any problems with it. Reactions are usually more likely after the first dose than after the second.

Mild Problems

  • Soreness or swelling where the shot was given (about 1 out of 5 children and up to 1 out of 3 adolescents and adults)
  • Fever (1 person out of 10, or less)
  • Mild rash, up to a month after vaccination (1 person out of 25). It is possible for these people to infect other members of their household, but this is rare.

Note: The first dose of MMRV vaccine has been associated with rash and higher rates of fever than MMR and varicella vaccines given separately. Rash has been reported in about 1 person in 20 and fever in about 1 person in 5. Seizures caused by a fever are also reported more often after MMRV. These usually occur 5-12 days after the first dose.

Moderate Problems

  • Seizure (jerking or staring) caused by fever (very rare).

Severe Problems

  • Pneumonia (very rare)

Other serious problems, including severe brain reactions and low blood count, have been reported after chickenpox vaccination. These happen so rarely experts cannot tell whether they are caused by the vaccine or not. If they are, it is rare.

This information was taken directly from the Varicella VIS
(This information taken from Varicella VIS dated 3/13/08. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Yellow Fever vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from Yellow Fever vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, could cause a serious reaction. But the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is low.

Mild Problems

Yellow fever vaccine has been associated with fever, and with aches, soreness, redness or swelling where the shot was given.

These problems occur in up to 1 person out of 4. They usually begin soon after the shot, and can last up to a week.

Severe Problems

  • Severe allergic reaction to a vaccine component (about 1 person in 55,000).
  • Severe nervous system reaction (about 1 person in 125,000).
  • Life-threatening severe illness with organ failure (about 1 person in 250,000). More than half the people who suffer this side effect die.

    These last two problems have never been reported after a booster dose.

This information was taken directly from the Yellow Fever VIS
(This information taken from Yellow Fever VIS dated 3/30/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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What if there is a moderate or severe reaction?

What should I look for?

  • Any unusual condition, such as a high fever or unusual behavior. Signs of a serious allergic reaction can include difficulty breathing, hoarseness or wheezing, hives, paleness, weakness, a fast heart beat or dizziness.

What should I do?

  • Call a doctor, or get the person to a doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor what happened, the date and time it happened, and when the vaccination was given.
  • Ask your doctor, nurse, or health department to report the reaction by filing a Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) form. Or you can file this report through the VAERS web site at http://www.vaers.hhs.gov, or by calling
    1-800-822-7967.
  • VAERS does not provide medical advice.

BestCare Provides Professional Health Care

At BestCare Family Medical Center we want to be your "Family Doctor in Garland". Whenever you need medical care, urgent care, and emergency care in Garland you can always trust BestCare! We provide quality health care and we're easy to find. Our family medical center is located in Garland Tx, we also serve Dallas, Mesquite, Richardson, Rowlett, Rockwall, Wylie, Sachse and the surrounding communities. Call BestCare at 972-240-1789 to schedule an appointment today.

Allergy sufferers can finally enjoy the great outdoors just as Nature intended!

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Learn how Immunotherapy treatment can alleviate or
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No more itchy or watery eyes.apple
No more pills and mists.
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But the most important ears
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A doctor's eyes can tell him a lot. His ears can tell him more. Because listening and healing go hand in hand.

(972) 240-1789

David Carlson, MD

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Dr. David Carlson, Bestcare Medical Director, has been serving the community for more than 25 years.
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The best medicine starts
with being heard.

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No one since the beginning of time has ever cured anyone by ignoring them. When doctors really listen, patients recover faster.

(972) 240-1789

Josanne Howard, PA

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Educated in Texas and Pennsylvania, Josanne Howard, PA (left) brings warmth, a positive attitude and and broad knowledge as a seasoned veteran of emergency and urgent care. 
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Lauren Page, PA

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Lauren Page graduated from UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth and is a trusted member of the Bestcare team whom our patients love! 
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There's a reason you don't
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when you're sick.

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Having a family doctor means having a doctor who knows you. You're not just a nameless face in the crowd hoping for the best. That's why having a family doctor assures you of the BestCare.

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Meet the friendly and experienced medical staff who make the challenge of getting well easy and fast. 
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Sometimes listening reveals
more than an x-ray.

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At Bestcare, our mission is healing. Not just treatment. Healing begins with the ability to listen. That's why having a family doctor is a lot like having a doctor in the family.

(972) 240-1789

Easy 4 U

Call Ahead Service

It's like getting here before you actually get here. Call us just before you leave and get your name on the list. When you arrive, your wait will be minimal.

Call Waiting

We also have a Convenient Call Waiting Service. If you want to leave BestCare before you've been seen, give us a phone number and we'll call as soon as we're ready to see you.

Bestcare Services

Primary Care

General illnesses
Immunizations
Annual physicals
School physicals
Well-woman exams
Pregnancy tests
Flu shots and flu tests
Medical check-ups
HIV screenings
Depression
EKGs
Check-ups

 

Urgent Care

X-rays
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We are dedicated to providing truly professional medical care in a clean, germ-free space.  More...

Cardiovascular Screening

More than 68 million Americans currently have one or more forms of cardiovascular disease. Many more are said to be at risk for developing the disease. Our assessment embraces all the scientific, clinical and public health disciplines that address the causes and prevention of cardiovascular disease, as well as cardiovascular rehabilitation and exercise physiology. Come in now to discover whether you are at risk and what that actually means.

 

Having a family doctor is like having a doctor in the family

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It's no accident D Magazine named us the "Best Doctors in Dallas" for Family Medicine. For more than 20 years, we've been healing, mending and making Texans well in a meticulously clean facility. When you come to BestCare you'll see the friendly face of a doctor you know. BestCare Family Medical Center is easy to get to and offers two choices: Our Urgent Care Center takes walk-ins—no appointment necessary. Or set an appointment online or by phone for Primary Care. Have a daytime job? We'll see you over lunch, after work or on weekends. Our in-house X-rays and lab work are less expensive, too!   Learn more...

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  • Avoid the long waits and hassles of emergency room x-rays when you need walk-in emergency care in Garland.
    • Urgent Care
  • You can come to Bestcare for minor emergencies including all manner of non-life-threatening medical situations.
    • Urgent Care
  • We provide allergy testing and Immunotherapy treatment to alleviate or eliminate your allergy symptoms.
    • Primary Care
  • Flu shots and tests. Immunizations. Flu shots take time to work, get yours in August and September.
    • Primary Care
  • We test to diagnose sniffles, sore throat and coughs using our own lab facilities right on premises.  You can come
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  • Medical Checkups, annual physicals, school physicals. Wellness Physical. Well-Woman exams.
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  • For 25 years, Bestcare has treated children of all ages. In addition to being medical professionals, we also parents.
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  • We provide discrete treatment for sexual transmitted diseases including HIV screening and treatment.
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  • As people age, they often experience varying kinds of aches and pains, from headaches to acid reflux.
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  • Dr. David Carlson can teach you everything you need to know about diabetes.
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  • In April 2013, a medical journal called Annals of Allergy, Asthma
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  • It’s best to treat any eye injury as a potential emergency.  Some types of infections can cause serious harm in
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  • Obesity is a medical problem that we can help you overcome.
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